What does B.A. undergraduate research/experience involve?

There are many possibilities for biology-related experiences. Any of the research opportunities available to BS students can be used by BA students to satisfy this requirement.

Undergraduates working in labs or on other biology-related experiences are expected to actively participate in the program of the organization or institution with which they are affiliated. Some undergraduates may work on a project of their own design, in consultation with their major adviser.

Undergraduate research involves committing to actively participate in the research program of a faculty member, working on a project that is biology-related in its subject matter.  

To receive credit, it is expected that a student will spend 6 to 8 hours a week during the semester engaged in these activities. They may be asked to join a weekly meeting, commit to regular blocks of time when they are available, work alongside a graduate student or other professional, and enjoy other responsibilities as described by their mentor.


A biology-related experience that counts toward the B.A. degree in Biology must involve committing to actively participate in working on a project that is biology-related in its subject matter but is not research. This experience may have a direct faculty mentor and/or a non-faculty mentor who can facilitate such an experience outside of Wake Forest University.

Our expectation is that a student will spend 6 to 8 hours a week during the semester engaged in the biology-related experience. They may be asked to join weekly meetings, commit to a regular block or blocks of time to work on their project, and other responsibilities as described by the individual who is serving as their mentor for this project.

Some experiences may relate to science communication and could involve serving as an intern with a science journalist or working on news articles on scientific topics for a media publication.

Other experiences may relate to science education and could involve shadowing and working closely with local science teachers in K-12 settings to understand how science is taught in public schools.

Others may also involve interning at a public health department and gaining experience in how these departments work to track diseases and administer vaccines to the public.

The ideas are just that – ideas! We encourage you to pursue your own ideas as well.

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